In  Harvard Business Review's Make Your Career a Success by Your Own Measure, Monique Valcour laments today's collapsing hierarchical structures and offers insights into how each of us, Gen Y'ers and Boomers alike, can redefine success without the common external success markers that have prevailed to the U.S. Workforce for so long:  Salary, Raises, Bonuses, and Promotions.

The reality in the post-recession economy is that, although a limited availability of each of these things still exist, they are no longer available in great abundance, and for some us of, not at all.  That leaves all managers...and all employees....at a cross roads.  How do we define personal success, when so many of the external markers on which we've relied have been removed due to tight salary increases, lagging indicators, flattening hierarchies, and the growth of the self-managed employee?  Dr. Valcour offers fifteen different options to begin generating your own personal definition.

But I would offer the same challenge to organizations:  Without the the motivation tools that predominated the workforce for generations, how will we help give our employees a feeling of achievement in their careers?  Dr. Valcour's suggestions are powerful.  But without organizations that provide support for contemporary reward and recognition alternatives (peer to peer recognition programs, social recognition, expert designation, top performer clubs, etc.) the workforce will once again walk away empty-handed and un-motivated.