Appendix A: Complete Summary List of Survey Findings
  • 82% of employees and 84% of managers prefer either more or the same amount of time working remotely then they are currently allowed.
  • Of these, 37.5% of employees and 39% of managers prefer to spend more time working remotely than they are currently allowed.
  • The average preferred number of remote working days is 3.7.
  • About 30% of our respondents would either take a significant pay cut (7%) or look for another job (23%) if denied the opportunity to work their desired number of days remotely.
  • Those 25-44 years-old (35%), and women (40%) are most likely to leave if denied their preferred remote work time.
  • 62% of managers and 64% of employees say they are most productive when working hybrid or fully remotely versus about 20% who feel most productive on-site (the remainder believe they are equally productive either way).
  • 49% of managers assess their remote and hybrid workers’ productivity higher than that of on-site workers. However, about 33% believe their reports are most productive onsite, suggesting a significant disconnect between manager and employee perceptions of performance.
  • Only 5 of the 424 managers who responded to our survey said they have no concerns regarding remote work. Most managers and employees are concerned about isolation, communications challenges and less exchange of ideas and information.
  • Managers matter. One-to-one appreciation from a direct manager is the most motivating form of recognition according to our respondents.
  • Among intangible rewards, employees want interesting work, growth opportunities and autonomy, in that order.
  • Among tangible rewards, employees want, in order, cash, gift cards, gifts, points and individual travel.
  • For increasing engagement and retention specifically, respondents rank in order: compensation, work environment, and “other tangible incentives and rewards” as most vital. Among intangible incentives, they value autonomy, interesting work, growth opportunities and appreciation/recognition.
  • While respondents clearly see the value of rewards and incentives, most can list no specific rewards or incentives that are singularly effective with remote workers, nor do most see a specific role for incentives and rewards in alleviating their remote work concerns.
  • Among the managers and employees who have experienced specific reward efficacy for remote workers (100 managers/119 employees), and who believe rewards have a role to play in addressing their concerns (77 managers/98 employees), granting more autonomy, flextime and paid time off were common responses. Many also cited points, personal gifts, group meals/celebrations, and peer-to-peer recognition programs.